B is for Big Bang | Children’s Books and Other Media About the Big Bang and Universe

Here is a complete list of books, movies, TV shows, and other media to accompany the B is for Big Bang thematic unit for the Science ABCs!

Please note that some of the links included are affiliate links. That means that if you follow the link and purchase something, I earn a small commission for my recommendation. This support helps keep my resources free and is much appreciated!

Books

These books are all Science Mom tested and Science Kid approved! They aren’t just random recommendations, but all live on our bookshelves at home.

Click the book picture to be taken straight to Amazon’s details about the book!

Picture Books About the Big Bang

Other Picture Books for This Unit

Online Videos

About the Big Bang

About the Universe and Solar System

About Atoms

About Numbers

Online Kids’ Games About Space

NASA Space Place

NASA Kids Club

NatGeo Kids – Space Janitor

Discovery Kids Space Games

Magic School Bus Space Games

Have a resource you’d like to see included? Leave a comment or contact us!

B is for Big Bang | Projects for Little Hands

We had so much fun working on the B is for Big Bang unit! Here are some of the fun projects referenced in the thematic unit for you to try at home!

Also, totally by coincidence, I realized the B alliteration continues with these activities – bottle, balloon, bin, and bread (sorry, atom)!

Please note that some of the links included in my unit plans are affiliate links. That means that if you follow the link and purchase something, I earn a small commission for my recommendation. This support helps keep my resources free and is much appreciated!


Universe in a Bottle

Preparing For This Activity

What You’ll Need:

  • A water bottle or other clear container that can be sealed
  • Water
  • Glitter glue
  • Loose glitter
  • Goo Gone (to remove any sticky residue on your container, optional)
  • Any other metallic objects you may want to add (optional)
  • Food coloring (optional)
  • Cotton balls (optional)
  • Mixing bowl and funnel (optional)

Before You Start:

Gather your materials and make sure you have everything ready to go. Remove any labels and remove residue with Goo Gone before you get going!

Making Your Universe

This is a really simple construction project. Simply fill the bottle with hot water and dissolve glitter glue to make a sparkly solution. Add loose glitter, food coloring, or other materials as you see fit, to make your universe work for you!  You can also opt to tear apart some cotton balls to make “gaseous clouds” in your universe.

I have found that it’s easier to mix the ingredients (except the cotton balls, if you opt to use them) outside of the bottle. However, a glittery gluey spill is not fun, so if you mix in a bowl, plan to use a funnel to get the mixture inside the bottle.

Activities With Your Universe

First and foremost, this is just fun to play with. You can let your little scientist just explore it and call this activity done.

Or you can go one step further and use it as a Big Bang demonstration. Let all of the glitter and contents settle to the bottom to represent singularity. Then begin to shake it vigorously, representing the time immediately following the Big Bang when the universe was expanding and full of energy. Then, let it rest. The objects/glitter will slow down, representing more of the current universe.


Big Bang Balloon Lab

Preparing For This Activity

What You’ll Need:

  • A balloon
  • A marker
  • A piece of string

Before You Start:

The set up for this activity is quick and easy. Simply inflate your balloon slightly. Use a marker to make a few dots or swirls around the balloon. Then, let the air out. You’re ready to begin!

Demonstrating the Big Bang

Explain that the balloon represents the universe. Before you begin blowing it up, the balloon represents singularity. All of the “stuff” is still there on the balloon, the balloon is the same mass, but it doesn’t take up as much space.

Then, slowly start to inflate the balloon. Ask your little scientists what they notice. The balloon itself still has the same mass and nothing has been added, but it’s starting to look very different.

Inflate it slightly more. Again, same mass, but it’s now getting bigger. The dots or swirls that represent the galaxies are further apart. They might even look like a slightly different shape. At this point, you might want to use a piece of string to measure the distance of the “galaxies” with your little scientist, so they can see the size increasing concretely.

Continue inflating the balloon as much as you want to make the point and continue the fun!

 


Universe Sensory Bin

Making Your Sensory Bin

I’m going to be honest, there are a million ways to make these sensory bins. If you head to Pinterest and search for sensory bins, you’ll find lots and lots of options. So, instead of telling you how to make the exact same bin that we made, I’m going to give you some suggestions to mix and match for your own perfect sensory bin.

As you browse my suggestions, keep your own little scientist’s exploration methods in mind, especially if they like to explore with their mouths. Some of these materials can be choking hazards, so always use your parental discretion and supervise this activity!

Open Space

You’ll want something dark as your base for wide open space. Black beans, coffee beans, coffee grounds, or black aquarium gravel can all be good options for this. You could even mix multiple ingredients together.

Stars & Planets

You can use glitter, small and large beads, small star confetti, marbles, small balls, cut-out clip-art, or even cut up yellow paper to represent these celestial bodies!

 Galaxies

If you want to mimic some galaxies and floating clouds of dust/gas, you could dip some shredded cotton ball bits into paint/glitter and add them to the sensory bin for even more textures!

Rockets & Satellites

There are a bunch of different options here, with the most basic being printing out pictures from the internet. For a bit more extended play, you could also consider a play set like this 15-piece Mission to Mars Space Shuttle Play Set or even a building set like this Lego City Space Starter Set that will provide a whole second activity to build!

Extension Activities

If you’re looking for some extra letter practice, check out this activity with glow stars and letters!


Cosmic Inflation Bread Project

Preparing For This Activity

What You’ll Need:

  • 2 cups warm water
  • 6 cups of flour
  • 1/3 cups of white sugar
  • 1.5 teaspoons of salt
  • 1.5 tablespoons of yeast
  • 1/4 cup of vegetable oil
  • 1/2-1 cup of raisins or chocolate chips
  • Alternatively, buy a prepackaged bread mix!
  • 2 bread pans
  • 2 mixing bowls
  • Plastic wrap
  • Butter (to grease resting bowl and bread pans)

Before You Start:

I highly recommend organizing your ingredients before inviting your preschooler into the kitchen. When it comes to a potentially messy project like this, I find it helpful to get myself situated first.

Then, make sure everyone does a thorough hand washing. You will all be getting very touchy feely with this edible project! Let’s not turn this into a different kind of science experiment, right?

Making Your Bread

If you’re making your bread from a prepackaged mix, just skim the directions for when we make connections between the bread and universe! Make sure to add your raisins or chocolate chips into the mixture still!

Now, to make your dough from scratch. Mix your 2 cups of warm water and 1/3 cup of white sugar together in a bowl. (Note: this entire thing will be easier with a stand mixer, but it’s totally achievable with a little extra muscle and either a hand mixer or your hands!) Sprinkle your 1.5 tablespoons of yeast over the top and let it dissolve into the mixture for about 10 minutes (this is a great time to watch a video or read a book from this post!). Add your 1.5 teaspoons of salt, 1/4 cup of oil, and 3 cups of flour and mix it together well (this is a good step for little hands to take the lead!). Once it’s mixed well, add the other 3 cups of flour and chocolate chips or raisins.

Now, it’s time for some aggression to get it all combined. You’ll know it’s done when your dough pulls away from the sides of the mixing bowl. If you have a dough hook for your stand mixer, this would be the time to use it. Once it’s well mixed, flour your countertop (that’s clean!) and knead your dough. This is another great time for the kids to get involved. This is a good time to start drawing comparisons to the dough and “singularity” before the Big Bang. While they’re kneading, grease a bowl for your dough to rest in.

When the dough is finished, place it in your greased bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Ask them to make a hypothesis (guess) about what’s going to happen to the dough while it rests. Will it change size or shape? Bigger, smaller, the same? Will the chocolate chips/raisins still be in the same place, further apart, or closer together? Then, let the dough rest for an hour, checking on it every 10-15 minutes. As you check in on your dough, ask them to evaluate their hypothesis. Is the dough doing what they expected? What is happening to the add-ins? You can also begin to explain that this is kind of like what happened during cosmic inflation. There was a tremendous amount of heat and movement that caused singularity expand exponentially outward. All of the different “ingredients” mixed together to form matter and took different forms throughout the process.

When your dough has rested for an hour, remove the cover and punch down the dough, before moving it back to your floured counter. Cut your dough in half and roll out into rectangles. Roll those dough rectangles up into greased bread pans and let them rest again until they’ve doubled in size (less than an hour this time!). You can explain that the universe continues to expand, just like the dough, and that the objects in the universe continue to move apart (represented by the add-ins). (Note: You could also break your dough into two separate bowls before letting it rest the first time and do an extended experiment, perhaps leaving one to rest somewhere cool and one somewhere warm, or anything else you can dream up!)

As your dough nears doubling in size, preheat your oven to 350F. Make sure your preschooler knows that the oven is hot and use precautions to keep everyone safe! Bake your bread for 25-30 minutes, until you can tap and it sounds hollow. Let it cool before letting little hands touch it! You could continue to draw comparisons, by explaining how the bread is baking and changing forms with heat, or how the bread itself has spread out, creating holes inside the bread, like dark matter in the universe, or even how the universe and bread were both hot, but then cooled off into something we humans can enjoy!


DIY Atoms of the Early Universe

Preparing For This Activity

What You’ll Need:

  • Three paper plates (or circles cut out of paper)
  • Marker
  • Glue
  • Pom poms

Before You Start:

If you plan to do the accompanying math activity, you can have your little scientist do some of the pom pom sorting for you, but you’ll still need to presort out 18 pom poms, in different colored sets of 6. I suggest using red, yellow, and blue to keep the colors different enough for the sorting and imagery to be really effective and clear!

Making Your Atoms

You get to the be universe! It’s time to make atoms! This activity will yield three “atoms”, for the first three elements of the universe – hydrogen, lithium, and helium. Of course, you can make any atoms you want too!

You can choose to do this activity two ways – completing each atom individually or working on them all together. Whichever way makes the most sense for your learner.

Hydrogen Atom

Have your little scientist draw one large circle around the outside of the plate to represent the electron’s orbit.

Then, glue one proton (red pom pom) in the center of the paper plate (the nucleus). Glue one electron (blue pom pom) to the orbital path. And you have a hydrogen atom!

Helium Atom

Repeat the same steps, but this time, your little scientist will glue two protons (red pom poms) and two neutrons (yellow pom poms) in the center to form the nucleus, and two electrons (blue pom poms) to the orbital path. You have helium!

Lithium Atom

Repeat the same steps, but this time, your little scientist will draw two circles around the outside of the plate to represent the electrons’ orbit. Then, they’ll glue three protons (red pom poms) and four neutrons (yellow pom poms) in the nucleus and three electrons (blue pom poms) to the orbital path. You have lithium!

 


Have any other fun activities to suggest? Questions? Leave me a comment!

121 Ways to Teach Yourself About Science

If you’re like me, you might have hated science in school. Or just didn’t understand the value. Or didn’t retain a single thing. Maybe all of the above.

My freshman honors biology class was like torture, sitting in a lab that we never touched. My college anatomy class was hours of note taking that never got applied to anything but test taking. Conversely, my physical science class was so basic that I hardly ever went.

When I look back at my science education, the word boring comes to mind in big neon lights. But now, STEM is evolving. It’s engaging and humorous and really, really exciting. The truth is that STEM has always been this way, but we were just more disconnected from it. Now, we have more information at our fingertips. I mean, Elon Musk just launched a Tesla Roadster into space and we get to see pictures!

If you find yourself wishing that you’d paid more attention in science class, especially as your kids learn, there are tons of resources out there. Here’s my ultimate list of resources to teach yourself about science!

Some of the links included in my posts are affiliate links. That means that if you follow the link and purchase something, I earn a small commission for my recommendation. This support helps keep my site free and is much appreciated!

Books

Biology

Chemistry

Mathematics

Physics and the Cosmos

Religion & the Afterlife

Technology & Engineering

Women in Science

Miscellaneous Reads


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Streaming Series and Documentaries

I have limited time and brainpower these days (see: two toddlers), so I do a lot of science consumption by video. Here are some of my favorites on popular streaming services!

Netflix

Bill Nye Saves the World – Bill Nye the Science Guy for grownups
Brain Games – entertaining series exploring the tricks our brains can play on us
Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey – an incredible series about our universe
Dinotasia –
CGI storytelling of prehistoric creatures
Edge of the Universe – latest cosmic discoveries
Einstein’s Biggest Blunder – scientists explore Einstein’s theory of relativity
The Farthest Voyager in Space –
all about NASA’s 1977 launch of space probes
Great Human Odyssey –
scientists map humans’ journey from Africa
Horizon: Secrets of the Solar System – 
advances in astronomy
The Inexplicable Universe with Neil deGrasse Tyson – Neil talks technology and wonders of the Universe
Into the Inferno – amazing footage of volcanoes
Life – explore the variety of life on Earth
Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World – the history of the internet
The Mars Generation – teenagers at Space Camp
Mega Builders – engineering of awe-inspiring structures
Nature’s Greatest Events – how seasonal changes affect wildlife
Orbit: Earth’s Extraordinary Journey –
this series gets bonus points for female hosts
Planet Earth –
 travel the Earth from your couch (Note: all of the BBC Earth documentaries are worth a watch, like The Blue Planet, Planet Earth II, Frozen Planet, etc)
Race of Life – how wild animals continue to survive
The Secret Rules of Modern Living: Algorithms –
how they work and where we can find them
The Story of Maths – the history of math, from ancient Egypt to today
Tesla: Master of Lightning – awesome biodoc about Nikola Tesla
White Rabbit Project – from the producers of “MythBusters”, history’s greatest hits

Hulu

Destination Wild – travel around the world to see wildlife in their natural habitats
Hello World – a global look at the inventors and scientists of the future
How It’s Made – how everyday objects are engineered and manufactured
Mojo’s The Circuit – latest tech and gadget news
MythBusters – 
the classic show that busts urban legends and myths
NASA 360 – a look at NASA developed technology that’s changed our lives
NASA X – new innovations by NASA scientists
Secrets of Your Mind – an inside look at case studies about the human brain
StarTalk with Neil deGrasse Tyson – all things space with Neil

Amazon Prime

The Amazing World of Gravity – all about the physics of gravity
Bacterial World: Microbes that Rule Our World – all about bacteria
Birth of the Earth – the story of our planet
Clouds Are Not Spheres – a look at fractal geometry
Edison: The Father of Invention – a biodoc about the inventor
Einstein and the Theory of Relativity – learn about the theory and the scientists still conducting experiments about it
Everything and Nothing: the Science of Empty Space – 
a unique look at empty space
The Fabric of the Cosmos – a look at what makes up the Cosmos
The Fantastical World of Hormones – a look at the chemicals that control our bodies
Hawking – a biopic about Stephen Hawking and his incredible contributions
Henry Ford –
a biopic about Henry Ford and his innovations
How the Grand Canyon Was Made – new evidence of how the Grand Canyon was carved
Life on Us: A Microscopic Safari –
 a microscopic look at the creatures that live on our bodies
Mapping the Future: The Wonder of Algorithms – how algorithms can predict our lives
The Mystery of Dark Matter – explore what we know about dark matter
Nikola Tesla: The Genius Who Lit the World – a look a the father of our modern technological age
Order and Disorder: The Forces that Drive the Universe – a look at the laws of the Universe
The Poisoner’s Handbook – a screen adaption in the spirit of the book
Ring of Fire – explore the geological wonders of the Pacific
Sahara: Altering the Course of History – a look at the great Saharan Desert and the life that used to live there
Sight: The Story of Vision – how our eyes and brains help us see
Sonic Magic: The Wonder of Science and Sound – how sound has shaped our history
Virus Empire: From Sars to Ebola – how viruses have evolved and affect our world

Other Ways to Learn

There is a ton of information out there on the internet. Not all of it is good information, but there are piles of awesome YouTube videos, blogs (like mine, right?), and websites just waiting to answer your most burning science questions. If you’re ever wondering about something, look it up! Add terms like “101” or “introduction” to the subject matter and see what you can find.

One of my favorite ways to learn is to visit local museums and science centers. Some communities have more resources than others, but most of us find ourselves within driving distance of something! Also, check out your local museums, community centers, libraries’ adult programming departments, and universities for opportunities. You never know who might be coming to speak!

And as always, you can send me a message with a topic you’d like to see covered!

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Did I miss any awesome resources? Leave a comment or send me a message to update the list!

A is for Astronomy | Children’s Books and Other Media About Space

Here is a complete list of books, movies, TV shows, and other media to accompany the A is for Astronomy thematic unit for the Science ABCs!

Please note that some of the links included are affiliate links. That means that if you follow the link and purchase something, I earn a small commission for my recommendation. This support helps keep my resources free and is much appreciated!

Books

These books are all Science Mom tested and Science Kid approved! They aren’t just random recommendations, but all live on our bookshelves at home.

Picture Books About Space

Picture Books About Astronauts

Fiction Picture Books About Space

Online Videos

About Astronomy in General

Songs About the Planets

About Astronauts


Movies and TV Shows

Movies With a Space Theme

  

Educational Movies About Space

    

TV Shows With a Space Theme

  

Space Themed Shows Streaming on Netflix

Fishtronaut, Sid the Science Kid, Space Racers

Educational Shows About Space

   

Educational Shows Streaming on Netflix

Bill Nye the Science Guy, Cosmos, The Magic School Bus

 

Online Kids’ Games About Space

NASA Space Place

NASA Kids Club

NatGeo Kids – Space Janitor

Discovery Kids Space Games

Magic School Bus Space Games

 

Have a resource you’d like to see included? Leave a comment or contact us!

A is for Astronomy | Projects for Little Hands

For this unit, I decided to do three special astronomy based projects: moon sand, a cardboard space shuttle, and constellations.

Moon Sand {A Super Easy Recipe}

Making Moon Sand

rubymoonsand

Mix 4 cups of flour and 1/2 cup of baby (or vegetable) oil.

Voila! You’re done.

Really. It’s that easy. This is such a simple task that little hands can definitely help at every step of the way!

If you’re feeling fancy, try adding food coloring, glitter, small pebbles, extracts for scent… the possibilities are limitless! Adding a little black food coloring and glitter would give it a moon-like feeling.

Learning with Moon Sand

21078371_10155865611074610_2873125006600968542_nWe used our alphabet cutters to make the letter A (and others), molded the letter A out of sand, and traced A into the sand using fingers and other kitchen tools. We also used food coloring pens (Betty Crocker Easy Writers) to write on the sand!

Then, I let Ruby’s imagination run wild. She built all kinds of things and explored what she could and couldn’t do with the moon sand’s limitations.

Leave a comment and tell us what you did with it!

Storage

Unlike kinetic sand, this moon sand WILL dry out, so make sure to store it in an airtight container if you want to reuse it.

I keep a small stash of inexpensive plastic containers just for projects, so my nice stuff doesn’t disappear from my kitchen. You can find containers at the Dollar Tree or even wash out plastic food containers. I don’t recommend the latter for actual food storage (as they’re not meant to truly be reused), but for this kind of stuff, it’s great!

Cardboard Space Shuttle {A Creative Project}

Building the Space Shuttle

What You’ll Need:

  • A large cardboard box
  • Durable scissors
  • Paint and paintbrushes
  • Markers
  • Any other crafting supplies or household objects that you may desire (tin foil and random cap lids would be good ones!)

21231714_10155892348504610_5317496593823877564_nI tend to keep a stockpile of big Amazon boxes for projects just like this. We had the perfect large box, with room for both girls and low enough sides to allow them to get in and out unassisted.

We started by tucking in the shorter box flaps and cutting the longer box flaps to resemble wings. Then, Ruby painted the entire exterior white. We added a few details with paint and markers to make it more space shuttle like too.

If you want to take it one step further, you can also use another piece of cardboard (or the inside of the box) to make a “control panel”, with buttons, screens, and levers using markers, paint, and random household objects.

Learning About Space Shuttles

This is where it’s best to let a preschooler be a preschooler. Just let their imaginations lead the way as you blast off into space!

We also enjoyed watching some of NASA’s launch videos on YouTube!

Pipe Cleaner Constellations {Motor Skills Craft}

Making the Constellations

26733565_10156295039209610_3703965642611106383_nWhat You’ll Need:

  • Black pipe cleaners
  • Yellow pony beads
  • Pictures of the constellations
  • Dark construction paper (optional, for your background)

We started by discussing constellations. We have some awesome space books and have spent a lot of time at the Infinity Science Center, so the concept was familiar to Ruby. Still, it was fun to specifically talk about them and see her excitement about spotting them with her telescope later. We watched the video embedded below too. The characters are really adorable and gave a good primer!

Then, it was time to build our constellations. I pulled up a constellation map from Google Images and let her pick her favorite. She chose Gemini.

26731356_10156295039214610_7279221928615995597_n

The yellow pony beads represent the stars, while the pipe cleaners are the imaginary lines that astronomers use to connect constellations together. This is where the black paper background can come in handy, so the black pipe cleaners “disappear” into the blackness of “space”.

Ruby needed a little bit of help twisting the pony beads into place, but this was mostly a hands-off project for me! I really enjoyed watching her replicate the Gemini constellation and making some constellations of her own invention too!